Vintage Valentines in the Archives

In celebration of Valentine’s Day we are reposting this entry from 2020. Valentine’s Day gained popularity in the United States with the introduction of mass-produced Valentines cards around the middle of the 19th century. Most of these early cards have long since disappeared, but we are fortunate to have many examples of early 20th centuryContinue reading “Vintage Valentines in the Archives”

Burns Night

Today, January 25, is a day to celebrate the national bard of Scotland, Robert Burns. Burns was a poet and songwriter who left a deep imprint on the world in his short 37 years. His first collection of poetry Poems, Chiefly in the Scottish Dialect was published in 1786. This first edition is known asContinue reading “Burns Night”

Mamie Till-Mobley

November 23rd marks the 100th birthday of Mamie Till-Mobley, American teacher and civil rights activist. The 1955 lynching of her 14-year-old son Emmett Till was a catalyst for the 20th century Civil Rights Movement, and her own activism was no small part of the dissemination of Emmett’s story.

40th Anniversary of the Civic Center

Yesterday was the 40th anniversary of the Donald L. Tucker Civic Center! The Civic Center opened as the Tallahassee Leon County Civic Center on September 14th, 1981 to 3,000 guests with a performance by the Tallahassee Symphony. Planning for the Civic Center began in the early 1970s, with the acquisition of the 40 acres ofContinue reading “40th Anniversary of the Civic Center”

The Casual Dirac

The Paul A.M. Dirac Papers are a terrific source of information about the public, scholarly side of Paul Dirac: the lecturer, the genius mathematician, a theorist among theorists. However, in our eagerness to honor someone’s professional achievements, it’s easy to gloss over the rest of their personality, the private figure that coexists with the publicContinue reading “The Casual Dirac”

Asian Pacific American Heritage Month

This is a crosspost, click here to see the original by Kyung Kim. We are celebrating Asian and Pacific American Heritage this month. Congress proclaimed a week of May in 1979 as Asian/Pacific American Heritage Week, and in 1992, it designated May as Asian/Pacific American Heritage Month. The month of May was chosen to commemorate the firstContinue reading “Asian Pacific American Heritage Month”

Celebrating C.K. Steele

Charles Kenzie Steele was born on this day, February 17, in 1914. Steele was a prominent Civil Rights activist and one of the central organizers of the Tallahassee Bus Boycott in 1956. He moved to Tallahassee with his family in 1952 to become the preacher at Bethel Missionary Baptist Church. On May 27, 1956 twoContinue reading “Celebrating C.K. Steele”

On This Day in the Florida Flambeau, Friday, September 2, 1983

Today in 1983, a disgruntled reader sent in this letter to the editor of the Flambeau. In it, the reader describes the outcome of a trial and the potential effects that outcome will have on the City of Tallahassee. It is such a beautifully written letter that I still can’t tell whether or not it’sContinue reading “On This Day in the Florida Flambeau, Friday, September 2, 1983”

Telling Untold Stories Through the Emmett Till Archives

Friday August 28th marks the 65th anniversary of the abduction and murder of Emmett Till. Till’s murder is regarded as a significant catalyst for the mid-century African-American Civil Rights Movement. Calls for justice for Till still drive national conversations about racism and oppression in the United States. In 2015, Florida State University (FSU) Libraries SpecialContinue reading “Telling Untold Stories Through the Emmett Till Archives”