Recent Posts

75th Anniversary of Intercollegiate Sports at FSU

This past weekend marked the beginning of a season-long celebration of the 75th anniversary of intercollegiate sports at Florida State University. This season is our 75th intercollegiate season in football, basketball, baseball, golf, swimming, and tennis since our transition from Florida State College for Women (FSCW) to co-educational Florida State University in 1946. Below areContinue reading “75th Anniversary of Intercollegiate Sports at FSU”

Hymn To the… Purple and Gold?

Happy College Colors Day! To celebrate, we wanted to share an interesting bit of our university’s history with you. Though Florida State University is recognized by its garnet and gold school colors, FSU’s predecessor institutions went through several color changes before settling on the iconic combination that we are so familiar with today.  The storyContinue reading “Hymn To the… Purple and Gold?”

FSU Special Collections & Archives Reading Rooms are Open

Photos and editing by Kristin Hagaman Welcome back students! FSU Special Collections and Archives is looking forward to seeing you again, and we are ready to assist you this semester with your research or class visit needs.  As we return to in person research services, there have been a few changes implemented to ensure youContinue reading “FSU Special Collections & Archives Reading Rooms are Open”

Bowden’s Legacy at FSU in Images

A selection of images from Heritage & University Archives. Most of these images were created over the years by talented current and former staff of the university. We will continue to add new photographs over the next few weeks. Click here for more recent images from FSU News.

Amazing Grace: Tallahassee’s Countercultural Newspaper

What do you think of when you think of the culture of the late 1960s and 1970s? Hippies? Beatnik literature? Civil Rights? The Beatles? Woodstock?  All of those events, movements, people, and art that you might be thinking of belong to a certain period in history: the counterculture movement. Permeating everything from clothing, music, culture,Continue reading “Amazing Grace: Tallahassee’s Countercultural Newspaper”

The Casual Dirac

The Paul A.M. Dirac Papers are a terrific source of information about the public, scholarly side of Paul Dirac: the lecturer, the genius mathematician, a theorist among theorists. However, in our eagerness to honor someone’s professional achievements, it’s easy to gloss over the rest of their personality, the private figure that coexists with the publicContinue reading “The Casual Dirac”

Anniversary of the Civil Rights Act of 1964: Newly Digitized Material Coming Soon to the Digital Library

On July 2, 1964, President Lyndon Johnson signed the Civil Rights Act of 1964 into law. This legislation, and the Voting Rights Act of 1965, ended segregation and unequal voter registration requirements. It also prohibited employment-based discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, sex or national origin.1 This legislation would be passed a few weeksContinue reading “Anniversary of the Civil Rights Act of 1964: Newly Digitized Material Coming Soon to the Digital Library”

Seedling Till

An Original Poem by Linney Osias commemorating what would have been Emmett Till’s 80th birthday.

Propagating the Truth: Mamie and Me

I am honored to be writing about Mamie Till now more than ever because I am currently an Emmett Till Archives Intern at FSU. I have gotten to experience her story on a different level.

Social Responsibility and Libraries

Trigger Warning: This post contains slurs and epithets used against the LGBTQ+ community. The American Library Association describes its values as the following: Access Confidentiality/Privacy Democracy Diversity Education and Lifelong Learning Intellectual Freedom The Public Good Preservation Professionalism Service Social Responsibility Sustainability Social responsibility was the one that caught my attention immediately. To me, itContinue reading “Social Responsibility and Libraries”

Older Americans Month 2021

In March of 1944, a 43-year-old Senator Claude Pepper introduced a resolution to designate the second Sunday in October as “Old Folks Day.” While the resolution did not pass, Pepper would go on to devote much of his energies in the Senate and later in Congress, to ensure that elderly Americans retained the ability toContinue reading “Older Americans Month 2021”

Library History at FSU, Part 9: John and Mable Ringling Art Library

Governance of the John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art was given to FSU in 2000. The University oversaw the restoration and renovation of all four buildings on the complex: the Ca d’Zan, the Museum of Art, the Circus Museum, and the Historic Asolo Theater. The Art Library was established with The Ringling’s reopening underContinue reading “Library History at FSU, Part 9: John and Mable Ringling Art Library”

Commemorating May Day

FSU Special Collections & Archives commemorates May 20th, Florida’s Emancipation Day, and the history of Emancipation in the United States. On January 1, 1863, Abraham Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation.1 Because it only applied to states “in rebellion” it excluded enslaved people in the four border states that remained in the Union. Furthermore, its signingContinue reading “Commemorating May Day”

Celebrating Jane Yolen

May is Jewish Heritage Month and to celebrate, I wanted to also find a woman author on our shelves to highlight on the blog. I was excited, and a little embarrassed I didn’t already know, to find that Jane Yolen is a Jewish American author for whom we hold copies of primarily her children’s booksContinue reading “Celebrating Jane Yolen”

Library History at FSU, Part 8: Library and Learning Center at FSU Panama City

In 1972, the University of West Florida was directed by the Florida Board of Regents to establish a center of higher education in Panama City. The center was originally located in the Bay County School Board Office Building and the Gulf Coast Community College campus. The library was housed in Gulf Coast Community College. InContinue reading “Library History at FSU, Part 8: Library and Learning Center at FSU Panama City”

MythBusters Month Wrap-Up

Throughout the month of April we shared some of the most commonly held misconceptions and myths about Special Collections & Archives, and then proceeded to debunk them. Here is a roundup of all our mythbusting posts in case you missed one. Welcome to Special Collections & Archives MythBusters Month! by Rachel Duke Rachel showed usContinue reading “MythBusters Month Wrap-Up”

Library History at FSU, Part 7: College of Engineering Library

The FAMU-FSU College of Engineering was established in 1982 and is the only shared engineering college in the nation. The facilities were remodelled in 2011. It is located less than three miles from both FSU and FAMU campuses. College of Engineering students at both FAMU and FSU learn together at the joint College of EngineeringContinue reading “Library History at FSU, Part 7: College of Engineering Library”

University History and Mythology

As with any person, place, or institution of note, there are a multitude of myths that attach themselves to their histories through various avenues. They can range from fun anecdotes to harmful misrepresentations.

FSU SCA Artists’ Books Featured in New Digital Exhibit

Undergraduate students in the Spring 2021 “Museum Object” course (FSU Department of Art History) spent the semester developing and curating Show & Tell, an online exhibition of artists’ books. They collaborated with FSU Libraries Special Collections & Archives and the Small Craft Advisory Press (SCAP) and endeavored to use this year’s non-traditional exhibition format toContinue reading “FSU SCA Artists’ Books Featured in New Digital Exhibit”

Movie Myths: Busted!

We’ve all seen a movie or two that has a scene set in the Archives or a Special Collections Library. Movie magic can really show our work off well. The silver screen is notorious for exaggeration and over generalizing certain tasks and this is even true for the depictions of the world of Special CollectionsContinue reading “Movie Myths: Busted!”

Is it Lost in the Archives?: Discovery Myths and Archival Labor

Every so often in the news we hear about an important document that was previously unknown and discovered in the archives. Beginning in 2012, The Atlantic ran two pieces about one such example: The Leale Report. This is a perfect case to examine for making archival labor transparent and looking at several myths in theContinue reading “Is it Lost in the Archives?: Discovery Myths and Archival Labor”

Awareness and Perceptions of Archives

Has the internet impacted perceptions about archivists and the work we do? Caitlin Patterson’s article “Perceptions and Understandings of Archives in the Digital Age” intends to help us understand.1 Here are the main takeaways of her survey: Increased expectations to find both general information and archival materials online. Respondents felt that archives were inaccessible andContinue reading “Awareness and Perceptions of Archives”

“It’s all online, right?”: Myths of the Digital and the Archives

Among the many myths of the archives, the ones around digitization and digital libraries are perhaps the ones that can frustrate me the most. But then, I am a digital archivist so that will not surprise you. However, ever since archives started to digitize their materials and share them online, we’ve been battling these mythsContinue reading ““It’s all online, right?”: Myths of the Digital and the Archives”

Their Stories: Why Oral History Matters.

LGBTQ+ history has traditionally been passed down orally. Through stories, shared experiences, and even gossip, queer people have kept alive their art, colloquialisms, and their truth. Oral history is a huge component to understanding the queer experience (as for other cultures). However, it is a more modern development for institutions to note the value ofContinue reading “Their Stories: Why Oral History Matters.”

Pocket books: small volumes in the Shaw Collection

Today we are celebrating John MacKay Shaw on the anniversary of his death in 1984. Shaw (1897-1984) was a Scottish-born American businessman and philanthropist who collected works of British and American poetry related to the theme of childhood.  When talking about the Shaw collection, we often highlight the 5,000 first and rare editions of majorContinue reading “Pocket books: small volumes in the Shaw Collection”

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