Tag Archives: holidays

Holidays Hours

It’s that time of the year!

The Special Collections & Archives Research Center and Norwood Reading Room will be open 10am to 4:30pm Monday, December 19 to Friday, December, 23. The Claude Pepper Library will be open 9am to 5pm Monday, December 19 to Thursday, December 22. The Pepper Library will be closed on Friday, December 23.

The University, including the Libraries, will be closed Saturday, December 24 through Monday, January 2, 2017.

All Special Collections & Archives locations will resume our normal operating hours on Tuesday, January 3, 2017.

From all of us in Special Collections & Archives, we wish you all a very happy and safe holiday season!

Labor Day

Happy Labor Day everyone!

Special Collections & Archives is closed today, Monday, September 5th in observance of Labor Day. Please enjoy a safe and pleasant Labor Day weekend!

Happy Birthday, George Washington!

We here at Special Collections and Archives would like to wish George Washington a happy birthday. Though President’s Day was originally created to honor our nation’s first Commander in Chief, many states have since adapted it into a joint celebration which includes Abraham Lincoln’s and George Washington’s birthdays.

President’s day, federally known as Washington’s Day, originally fell on George Washington’s birthday, February 22 but in 1971 was moved to the 3rd Monday of February under the Uniform Monday Holiday Act. Montana, Minnesota, Utah and Colorado all recognize today as an official holiday honoring both Washington and Lincoln, whose birthday was on February 12th. With election season in full swing, we’d like to take the time to honor all of the United States’ presidents.

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Portrait of Washington in his colonel’s uniform – The Story of Washington
New York Herald newspaper from the day of President Lincoln's assassination.
Profile of President Abraham Lincoln from the New York Herald Newspaper – April 15, 1965

Land of the Free, Home of the Brave

ROTC members in the 1960s with the American flag.
ROTC members in the 1960s with the American flag. Original Object is in the FSUDL.

Special Collections & Archives will be closed today, July 3rd in observance of Independence Day. We will resume normal operating hours on Monday, July 6th.

All of us here wish you a safe and happy holiday!

Memorial Day Celebration Recitation

Memorial Day is a holiday that has changed over time. Today, we tend to associate it with barbeques, sales at the mall, a race on TV and a downtown parade. We often miss the original intention of the holiday, to remember and celebrate those brave men and women who’ve given their lives to protect the United States.

A book in our Shaw Childhood in Poetry collection, Dick’s Festival Reciter, by William B. Dick c1892, gives us a unique look at the holiday following the Civil War and its emphasis on re-uniting the country. Here are instructions for how to decorate and what should be on the schedule for a Memorial Day program circa 1892:

The hall or school assembly room should be profusely adorned with all the accessories emblematic of the occasion, the red, white, and blue being conspicuously represented by flags, shields, and other contrivances easily prepared with pasteboard and gilt and colored paper. Portraits of dead heroes, nicely draped, old military relics and accoutrements, and flowers lavishly displayed, add greatly to the appearance of the hall and the interest of the exercises. The platform for the speakers should especially be rendered as bright and attractive as possible, and to this end everything obtainable should be called into requisition for its adornment.
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Program

  1. Opening Chorus                     “Columbia the Gem of the Ocean”
  2. Oration                                       “Decoration Day”
  3. Recitation                                  “Them Yankee Blankits”
  4. Solo and Chorus                     “Viva l’America”
  5. Oration                                        “Tribute to Our Honored Dead”
  6. Recitation                                   “Memorial Day”
  7. Solo and Chorus                      “Marching through Georgia”
  8. Recitation                                   “Brothers Once More”
  9. Oration                                         “Sherman on the Veterans”
  10. Solo and Chorus                      “John Brown’s Body”
  11. Recitation                                   “The Day’s Oration is in Flowers”
  12. Reading                                       “Patriotic Sentiments”
  13. Recitation                                   “For Decoration Day”
  14. Recitation                                   “Our Dead Heroes”
  15. Chorus                                          “God Save the State”

The book then very helpfully also provides the text for all the recommended songs, orations, recitations and readings. In case you feel the need to recite this Memorial Day, here is “The Day’s Oration is in Flowers” by E.L. Hall:

The day’s oration is in flowers;
Sing, ye gardens! Speak, ye bowers!
Let Flora’s rarest banners wave
And fold about the solder’s grave.
Lo! June in red, and May in white,
Their hands will clasp, their brows unite
Above the mounds spread far and wide;
In vales and on the mountain-side;
Round monuments that speak and breathe,
The floral paragraphs we wreathe,
Will emblem glories that entwine
About their brows in climes divine.
Then sing, ye bowers, ye gardens, vie–
In silent eloquence reply.
While incense floats from sea to sea
On winds that sigh, “Let all be free!

Special Collections & Archives will be closed today, May 25th, in observance of Memorial Day. We will resume our normal operating hours on Tuesday, May 26th.

Happy Holidays!

Four unidentified students setting up outdoor Christmas decorations in front of the Westcott Building during the 1950s.
Four unidentified students setting up outdoor Christmas decorations in front of the Westcott Building during the 1950s.

We here at Florida State University’s Special Collections & Archives division would like to wish you a happy holiday season!

Our Special Collections Research Center will be available by appointment only December 22-23, 2014. Please contact Lisa Girard at (850) 645-0909 or email her at lgirard@fsu.edu to schedule an appointment. The Norwood Reading Room and the Special Collections Exhibit Room will maintain their normal operating hours on those dates.

Special Collections & Archives division will be closed starting Wednesday, December 24th. We’ll resume normal operating hours on Monday, January 5, 2015.

The Pepper Library Reading Room will be closed starting Tuesday, December 23rd and resume normal operating hours on Monday, January 5, 2015.

We’ll see you in the new year!

 

A Girl’s Own Christmas

girlsown_1
Cover of The Girl’s Own Annual Vol. 39, No. 3.

In our latest adventures as graduate assistants, Rebecca Bramlett and I have been learning how to digitize serials for the FSU Digital Library. This process involves scanning materials in the Digital Library Center, editing them, uploading them, and creating metadata for each issue. Using metadata to describe important features of the serials – such as date issued, subjects, and summary of contents – will make them easier to locate through database searches.

girlsown_2
Illustration from The Girl’s Own Annual (1917)

For this project, we are digitizing Volume 39 (12 issues) of The Girl’s Own Annual, a British serial for girls and young women that was published from 1880 until the 1950s. Volume 39 was published in 1917-1918, during World War I, when the girls’ and women’s publications were combined into The Girl’s Own Paper and Woman’s Magazine. Each issue of The Girl’s Own Annual contains a mixture of serial fiction, recipes, knitting and sewing patterns, housekeeping advice, and articles on topics of interest, such as the royal family, women’s education, and women’s contributions to the war effort. The Girl’s Own Annual is part of the John M. Shaw Childhood in Poetry Collection and will be added to the Poetry in the Great War collection in the FSU Digital Library.

Since winter break is almost upon us, this is the perfect time to take a look at the 1917 Christmas issue of The Girl’s Own Annual (Vol. 39, No. 3). For your reading enjoyment, let me present you with:

Five Ways to Have a Girl’s Own Christmas:

  1. Curl up with a stack of serial fiction. It’s the early-twentieth century version of a Netflix binge. The Christmas issue is fourteen pages longer than usual and full of extra stories. There’s the first two chapters of “The White Towers” – the story of a mysterious artist and the young art student who captures his attention – as well as two chapters of the romance story “Cicely Ann,” “The Typewriter’s Story: Which Ends with a Wedding,” and several Christmas-themed morality tales. A cup of tea and a roaring fire are optional but highly recommended.
  2. Then read something a little more substantial. Once you’ve satiated your serial fiction needs, you might want to turn to something more informative, such as a discussion of future inventions by Alexander Graham Bell (predicting a time “when we may be able to talk with a man in any part of the world by telephone and without wires”) or the editor’s article on women working outside the home.
  3. Sketch a snowy landscape. Issue No. 3 contains “When Snow is on the Landscape: The Fifth Article on Sketching in Colour,” with advice for sketching in the snow for those who won’t be spending their Christmas in Florida. Just remember, “If you begin to feel unmistakably chilly, pack up straight away.”
  4. Cook an elaborate Christmas dinner. 
    girlsown_3
    Children’s styles from 1917

    If you’re looking for a break from the usual turkey or ham, perhaps you could serve roast goose, venison, or pheasants? They would go well with potatoes baked with meat and mashed Jerusalem artichokes. And of course, no holiday is complete without old-fashioned Christmas pudding and a prune mould!

  5. Give everyone a homemade present. In a sea of mass-produced consumer goods, perhaps nothing says “I love you” better than a hand-crocheted cap or bonnet, a set of d’oillies with embroidery and filet crochet, or a homemade children’s coat (shown right).

Volume 39 of The Girl’s Own Annual is available to read online at the FSU Digital Library. Additional volumes from the 1880s-1920s are also available in the John M. Shaw Childhood in Poetry Collection and may be accessed through the Special Collections Research Center.

Katherine Hoarn is a graduate assistant in Special Collections & Archives. She is working on her Master of Library and Information Science degree at Florida State University.

Valentine’s Day

FEBRUARY

The sun rides higher

Every trip.

The sidewalk shows.

Icicles drip.

A snowstorm comes,

And cars are stuck,

And ashes fly

From the old town truck.

Valentine heart with birds

The chickadees

Grow plump on seed

That Mother pours

Where they can feed,

And snipping, snipping

Scissors run

To cut out hearts

For everyone.

by

John Updike

in

Good Morning to You, Valentine, poems selected by Lee Bennett Hopkins, illustrated by Tommie de Paola

Shaw Collection, PZ8.3 G6

Snow in Florida!

snow pictureOn February 13th, 1958, the Florida State University campus experienced a snowfall.   We have several pictures of students enjoying the snow, but we thought this one was appropriate for the season.

Happy Holidays from Special Collections!

Holiday Display

Celebrating the Holidays with an
Exhibit from Special Collections and Archives

signHaving a winter-theme display in the Reading Room has become something for the FSU students to browse when they want to take a break from studying for finals. With this year’s theme, I immediately started brainstorming and knew I wanted to use cookbooks. The holidays are times of festive cooking, baking, and preparing special recipes for scrumptious meals

recipeThe three cookbooks I selected are from our “delicious” Florida collection. I wanted to make sure each book not only had detailed recipes, but also pictures or illustrations to bolster one’s appetite.

If anyone has been to Ybor City, the Columbia Restaurant is a Florida landmark. What could be tastier than Florida Citrus snowflake cookies with Florida Orange Juice? Who says it never snows in Florida? And the Florida Panhandle cookbook Four Seasons has the best Red Velvet Cake and eggnog recipes, which are holiday favorites.

kids1I knew many good choices for holiday images would be in our John Shaw collection, which contains an extensive assortment of poetry and children’s books. Of these I selected the classic The Night Before Christmas but with a slight twist representing our furry friends – dogs & cats – and, of course, the people who are  part of children’s lives everywhere – teachers!

There were some rare books that I picked out simply because they had festive artwork on the covers or unique illustrations. King Winter is a picturesque book cut in the form of “Jack Frost.”  One of the book covers that I especially enjoyed was Christmas Garland, a wonderful book containing several holiday essays, done in a royal blue with the title and a wreath of hollies in a gold typeset. Two beautifully illustrated books that I found appealing were Nister’s Holiday Annual and Nutcracker of Nuremberg. The first book is a collection of holiday-themed stories, with bright, magnificent colored illustrations. The second book has both black and white and colored illustrations; some of the illustrations have separate pages, while others form a border around the text.

case2 case1

I hope you enjoy the exhibit as much as I did putting it together!

Wishing you and yours a joyous holiday season,
Carole